Tag Archive for lesson plans

Getting to Know Students and their Tech Interests

7342218648_62b706ab90_z

(img: Raspberry Pi + Lego computer, Flickr: pikesley)

In “The Computer in School: Tutor, Tool, Tutee,” Robert Taylor viewed the computer as serving three potential roles for students: 1) a tutor, delivering instruction to students, 2) a tool, which students would use to achieve learning, and 3) a tutee, which students would instruct through programming and design activities and thus themselves implicitly “shift the focus of education in the classroom from end product to process, from acquiring facts to manipulating and understanding them.” My observation is that most of our current ed tech field focuses exclusively on the first of these roles– viewing computing as a tutor (online/blended instruction, adaptive testing, flipped class, Khan Academy, etc).

Part of the underlying philosophy of a 1:1 program is a desire to expand the use of the computer as a tool, since each student then has a computer as part of their school toolkit. This is especially true in a program such as ours where students own and administer the device, since the students can now customize and develop the tool to best fit their own needs, uses and interests (Do I remember right that in Star Wars, you had to build your own lightsaber before you could become a Jedi?). Our work embedding computer science into math and science classes, as well as our robotics and physical computing projects through our maker space, are explorations into the tutee role of computers, and using the programming as an oblique strategy towards non-computing curricular goals.

In my own Digital Media class this year, I am challenging myself to create as many tool and tutee opportunities for students as possible, so that they may understand and master a concept that I consider to be crucial to modern responsible technology usage: computers are not meant to be accepted “as is” and used off-the-shelf. Modern technology usage must involve the skills and confidence to modify and customize a piece of technology to fit each person individually. While it is quite dated now, I highly recommend reading Neal Stephenson’s “In the Beginning… Was the Command Line,” available as a free download from the author’s website for more on this concept.

Over at A Recursive Process, Dan Anderson shared an activity called “My Favorite” with his math students. The concept is to pick a favorite math topic from anything, and share it with the class. I love this idea, and am modifying it for my first day of class.

Read more

Organisms and Interactions: 6th Gr Sci (3 of 3)

Figure 3. The Export Movie option will let me send the movie straight to the Camera ROll.

Step 3: Assemble the Project

A challenge came from Quynh Tu, our 6th Grade Science teacher. She has a great organisms and ecosystems project that she wants to move from a poster-based product to an iPad-based one. As she describes it, the students have to create two organisms and describe them individually. Part of the description is the ecosystem in which they live and how they are adapted to it. The second level is that the organisms have to interact in some way (e.g. symbiotic, cooperative, parasitic). In the past, students have drawn their organisms out and labeled things on a poster. She’d like two main things to come out of “iPad-izing” the project:

  • Students can narrate the project, making them verbalize and expand their answers past the simpler poster labels, and
  • Students draw the ecosystem as well as the creatures, so that they have to describe more about the ecosystem’s effect on the creatures. She felt like this has gotten short shrift in the past.

I’ve broken this project down into three distinct stages, each with their own goals and tools:

  1. Build the Ecosystem
  2. Build the Organisms
  3. Assemble the Presentation/Movie

I covered both Step 1 and Step 2 in previous posts. Here, we’ll explore Step 3. To the lab!

Read more

Organisms and Interactions: 6th Gr Sci (2 of 3)

My amphibian creation. (123d Creature)

Step 2: Build the Organisms

A challenge came from Quynh Tu, our 6th Grade Science teacher. She has a great organisms and ecosystems project that she wants to move from a poster-based product to an iPad-based one. As she describes it, the students have to create two organisms and describe them individually. Part of the description is the ecosystem in which they live and how they are adapted to it. The second level is that the organisms have to interact in some way (e.g. symbiotic, cooperative, parasitic). In the past, students have drawn their organisms out and labeled things on a poster. She’d like two main things to come out of “iPad-izing” the project:

  • Students can narrate the project, making them verbalize and expand their answers past the simpler poster labels, and
  • Students draw the ecosystem as well as the creatures, so that they have to describe more about the ecosystem’s effect on the creatures. She felt like this has gotten short shrift in the past.

I’ve broken this project down into three distinct stages, each with their own goals and tools:

  1. Build the Ecosystem
  2. Build the Organisms
  3. Assemble the Presentation/Movie

I covered Step 1 in a previous post. Here, we’ll explore Step 2. To the lab!

Read more

Organisms and Interactions: 6th Grade Sci (1 of 3)

IMG_0122

Step 1: Build the Ecosystem

A challenge came from Quynh Tu, our 6th Grade Science teacher. She has a great organisms and ecosystems project that she wants to move from a poster-based product to an iPad-based one. As she describes it, the students have to create two organisms and describe them individually. Part of the description is the ecosystem in which they live and how they are adapted to it. The second level is that the organisms have to interact in some way (e.g. symbiotic, cooperative, parasitic). In the past, students have drawn their organisms out and labeled things on a poster. She’d like two main things to come out of “iPad-izing” the project:

  • Students can narrate the project, making them verbalize and expand their answers past the simpler poster labels, and
  • Students draw the ecosystem as well as the creatures, so that they have to describe more about the ecosystem’s effect on the creatures. She felt like this has gotten short shrift in the past.

I’ve broken this project down into three distinct stages, each with their own goals and tools:

  1. Build the Ecosystem
  2. Build the Organisms
  3. Assemble the Presentation/Movie

In this post, we’ll start with Step 1: Building the Ecosystem. To the lab!

Read more